How to translate French words WITHOUT KNOWING FRENCH (3 clever tricks)

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RobWords

RobWords

Gün önce

YORUMLAR: 4 488
Arckene
Arckene Aylar önce
Trick 4: replace "eu" with "o" in most words FR -> EN majeur -> major interieur -> interior terreur -> terror erreur -> error
wetfishbits
wetfishbits Gün önce
“o” is the expression we made when those dumb English dragged us out of the eu.
iWatchWithNoAds
iWatchWithNoAds 4 gün önce
@Ubu987 They replaced EU (European Union) with O (uhhh... Orgasms?)
Léo
Léo 7 gün önce
@Spark_Square ta gulge on s'en efoute tu fais fhcier tou tlje mobden
Memo William
Memo William 9 gün önce
@Bab Boon ... In German the ‘w’ is a ‘v’ sound If we add in the missing ‘s’ we get vespe. In Italian we get vespa.
Justin Kase
Justin Kase 21 gün önce
@Ubu987 Thanks, that will help me remember this rule lol.
Rob Manser
Rob Manser Aylar önce
Can I add some tricks? TRICK 4: All but four English words ending in "ion" are the same in French: impression, condition, indication etc. TRICK 5: Replace "ical" in English with "ique" in French and you're almost there. For example: practical, economical, strategical become pratique, economique, strategique.
TheDeadOfNight37
TheDeadOfNight37 6 gün önce
-ive adjectives are directly from French
williamgeorgefraser
williamgeorgefraser 6 gün önce
@Tara Zieminek The "ment" ending is always used after the feminine version of the adjective so it is "absurdement". It is even pronounced "ab-sur-de-ment".
Tara Zieminek
Tara Zieminek 6 gün önce
You can also replace "ment" with "ly" sometimes (absurdment/absurdly, sauvagement/savagely).
Pandore LDR
Pandore LDR 8 gün önce
amazing
williamgeorgefraser
williamgeorgefraser 11 gün önce
@TCt83067695 Apparently so. I've never had one so had to look up the dictionary.
alnath01
alnath01 Aylar önce
As a french, I've learned something ! And I'd say that your pronunciation of 'écureuil' is far better than my 'squirrel' pronunciation 😁
U R Phake And Gey
U R Phake And Gey 17 saatler önce
I've heard that "squirrel" is actually one of the hardest English words to pronounce for foreigners.
Neil070
Neil070 Gün önce
Écureuil is new to me, but I will now change the É and scureuil looks like "scurry" which is what the squirrels in my garden do. C'est facile!
Dan Quayles ITS SPELT POTATOE!
Dan Quayles ITS SPELT POTATOE! 11 gün önce
sbrandler, scarter, une scheance, scraser un sechec! schouer!
Dan Quayles ITS SPELT POTATOE!
Dan Quayles ITS SPELT POTATOE! 11 gün önce
the way to do it is add LE before the front of everything EG Le Rotisserie chicken Le Soup Le Oyster Le Orange But say with french accent!
Rabijeel
Rabijeel 16 gün önce
Äs sze Scherman Ai bätter säi nahssing hier.....
Glenn Gardner
Glenn Gardner Aylar önce
Excellent ! As a Québécois, I had to learn both languages from the get go; why these simple and obvious tricks were never taught escapes me ! Bravo for pointing them out and I will certainly pass the tricks along to my fellow quebecers who surely need the help! Kudos!
guzy1971
guzy1971 14 saatler önce
C’est vrai ça faciliterait l’apprentissage dans les deux sens
tacfoley
tacfoley Aylar önce
Tu as dis!
Erik S
Erik S Aylar önce
Oh! That's interesting! I am a French guy living in the US. I had never realized there was a pattern behind these adaptations! I help English speakers learn some French. I'll point them to these tricks! And by the way, your pronounciation of "ecurueil" is fine. We, French people, just tend to be picky for the sake of it!
Dieezah Translator-Songwriter
Dieezah Translator-Songwriter 20 gün önce
Funny you never realized there was a pattern. I guess they stopped explaining things in detail a few decades back. When I was a kid, the reason for "é" and "î" and similar accented letters was something that was explained in primary school. Ah, French education reforms...
Iain
Iain Yıl önce
Damn. I've been studying French for 25 years and never knew this. Well done man. Guell done.
La drôle de vie des animaux
La drôle de vie des animaux 7 gün önce
Mdr
Queebles
Queebles 25 gün önce
25 years? French children can learn french in just under a decade
Chai'naMarie03
Chai'naMarie03 29 gün önce
@Vicente M. Reyes How fluent have u become?
Chai'naMarie03
Chai'naMarie03 29 gün önce
@Ramikla _1 Yup, sadly ur right....but I was just following what my teachers were teaching.
Ramikla _1
Ramikla _1 29 gün önce
@Chai'naMarie03 YOU WASTED TIME ON GRAMMAR
Crusty Cobs
Crusty Cobs Aylar önce
Very clever, and should be taught the first week of French language class. It makes sense!
allan lanktree
allan lanktree Aylar önce
I'm from Canada, a country with French and English as official languages, and I've had a lifetime (63 years) of seeing the similarities. Joual, the French dialect of Quebec, is based on Breton French and Norman French, so some of the similarities are more obvious. Great video.
Nytracus
Nytracus 47 dakika önce
@Earthlings United pretty sure Europe had it's own squirrels before finding north America, did we just call them tree rats?
Jonathan Odude
Jonathan Odude 5 gün önce
@Yvon Q. you should read back through your own comments if you think that.
Yvon Q.
Yvon Q. 5 gün önce
@Jonathan Odude You are simply telling me you are extermly dumb without telling me you are basically?
Jonathan Odude
Jonathan Odude 5 gün önce
@Yvon Q. so... its french then?
Yvon Q.
Yvon Q. 5 gün önce
@Jonathan Odude Not to Gaelic obviously.
Michael Matthews
Michael Matthews Aylar önce
The most useful language I learned was Latin (though I was hopeless at it). Helps the understanding, pronunciation, and spelling of much English. It also helps with understanding French, Italian, Spanish, as it is the root of their languages. However the problem with French for many people is the pronunciation, as was demonstrated in the video. You can learn to read French and still not be able to understand it spoken or speak it. Italian and Spanish are much easier in that respect. You can apply some of your substitution tricks to other languages - a useful one is the Spanish '-dad': replace it with '-ty' and the English word often appears! ie 'Cuidad' becomes 'Cuity' (City) and 'Trinidad' becomes 'Trinity'.
Eva Stapaard
Eva Stapaard 2 gün önce
yessss. I can read french but can hardly understand when spoken
Elizabeth Anthony
Elizabeth Anthony 3 gün önce
It works with Felicidad too 😁👍
Jonathan Odude
Jonathan Odude 6 gün önce
@IparIpaitegian IparIpaitegian sounds that arent in english at all are used in french. thats tough no matter what the language pair is. if you didnt make those sounds as a baby copying your parents or hear them all the time as you were growing up, theyre extremely difficult. its why japanese speakers cannot pronounce "l" sounds while chinese speakers have them in their names.
q̵͑͜w̴̢̅e̵͖͐ŕ̵͙t̴̪̎y̶̻̋u̷͍͠ï̷̤o̷̲͐p̴͈̀a̴̘͛s̸̨͑d̷͠
q̵͑͜w̴̢̅e̵͖͐ŕ̵͙t̴̪̎y̶̻̋u̷͍͠ï̷̤o̷̲͐p̴͈̀a̴̘͛s̸̨͑d̷͠ 10 gün önce
@Ronnie Childs Because 41% to 60% of english words are from Old french which is closest to Latin. Makes sense.
Ronnie Childs
Ronnie Childs 10 gün önce
I agree. I took Latin because I thought it could come in handy with English, and it does. Also, didn't have to go to those awful pronunciation labs.
Tim Touhey
Tim Touhey 14 gün önce
Lovely to see someone not just learning a language but clearly really enjoying learning why it is the way it is!
Sébastien Dine
Sébastien Dine 2 aylar önce
There is one more trick also explained by the norman language: if a word starts with "ch" then try to drop the h letter after the c letter . For example with "chat" you get cat, with "char" you get car, with "chaudron" you get caudron (cauldron) and with "château" you get "casteau" (castle).
Eric Qerqia
Eric Qerqia Gün önce
Obvious asf
Pandore LDR
Pandore LDR 8 gün önce
Really good
q̵͑͜w̴̢̅e̵͖͐ŕ̵͙t̴̪̎y̶̻̋u̷͍͠ï̷̤o̷̲͐p̴͈̀a̴̘͛s̸̨͑d̷͠
q̵͑͜w̴̢̅e̵͖͐ŕ̵͙t̴̪̎y̶̻̋u̷͍͠ï̷̤o̷̲͐p̴͈̀a̴̘͛s̸̨͑d̷͠ 11 gün önce
@IparIpaitegian IparIpaitegian correct
Justin Davis
Justin Davis 11 gün önce
@IparIpaitegian IparIpaitegian you're nuts, thank you so much for this🙏
IparIpaitegian IparIpaitegian
IparIpaitegian IparIpaitegian 12 gün önce
The C before an accentuated latin vowel (castellum) became CH only around Pais. In the rest of Northern french dialects it remained C (the town Cateau Cambraisis). So castellum became Castel in Normandy and Chastel in Paris. Later, the S disappeared. In some areas, during the Middle Ages, the L at the end of words or followed by a consonant became U (same things occurs in the Brazilian portuguese, where final L are pronoun U: Braziu). So Chatel became Château in Paris, Cateau in Picardie. The Norman Castel became the English Castle.
Crazor
Crazor Aylar önce
I probably learned more in the 12 minutes watching this video than I did in 5 years of learning french at school.
WeeRedVixen
WeeRedVixen 17 gün önce
This is the first French lesson I have ever enjoyed. Thank you :)
OnlyPassingHere
OnlyPassingHere 19 gün önce
5:18 I live in Québec and the circonflexe accent does slightly change the prononciation in the French we speak here. Those different pronounciations were dropped in Europe during the last 250 years, but over here, they endured and are still present to this day. As such, Québec has 23 vowel sounds while France only has 15. Most of the French colonists that settled what would become Québec originally came from Normandy, hence why our French evolved in slightly different ways from Parisian French.
FON
FON Gün önce
The French you speak in Québec is actualy from Paris, it is the accent that was spoken by Louis XIV. While the language evolved in France from Time passing by, it stayed the same in Canada from a strong will to stay true to the King and his heritage. That's why to this day you still have Saint's Michael cross as your flag and we now have the tricolor banner
laripu
laripu Aylar önce
I love these videos. I grew up in a Yiddish-speaking family in Montréal, Québec. While my best language is English, I learned a serviceable amount of French from living and working in Québec. I retain a lot of Yiddish (which has some vocabulary similarity to German). I also have a German-speaking wife. So my German, while imperfect and delightfully gender-mutated, is at least useful. I maintain that some German and some French really helps a modern English speaker to understand Chaucer. Your videos confirm that. Thank you for that, and for being so entertaining!
AvesPa
AvesPa Aylar önce
That is exactly what I love about learning different languages... Seeing how close they are and how learning one brings the second one to the plate too. 🙂 Once, i thought my daughter would like Spanish because she would be able to spot the words similar to English that she already knows. Well, not. She prefer learning Korean, something completely different. 🤣
ABC
ABC Aylar önce
Thank u for the brilliant tips! Your explanation is so lively and concise. I didn’t know the English language borrows so much from the French language all because of William the Conqueror. This is better than reading any language guide book if we just wanna know basic French. This is such a wonderful & quick intro without boggling the mind too much. I’m gonna look out for some French words on food labels to try these rules out.
magister343
magister343 Aylar önce
It is not ALL due to William the Conqueror. There was a lot of contact between the Anglo-Saxons and Norman French well before the conquest, and some Norman words had already started to enter Old English. The process of course was greatly accelerated after William the Bastard's brutal subjugation of the English and a couple centuries where the ruling class of the lands used French exclusively (or Latin, in Church and most official written records). It may also be worth noting that both English and Norman French had considerable influence from the Vikings, so some Norman French words were already closer to English than to Parisian French. The Normans strongly rejected their Norse Pagan heritage though, and sometimes overcorrected words to be different from the other Vikings. There are some words where Parisian French was closer to Norse and to English than the Norman French was.
Van
Van 8 gün önce
I'm a native French and German speaker, and about 90% of my English vocabulary takes root from those languages. It's crazy how about 25% of English is from Latin, 25% from French and the remaining half from Germanic and Norse language. All without the difficult grammar and gender rules, if you already speak both languages it can take a year or less to become fluent!
Aiyic
Aiyic 13 gün önce
I love the "careful consonants" trick; if a French word ends with any of the consonants within "careful", it's not silent.
NverKnown
NverKnown 6 gün önce
That's a good trick! But since French always has an exception... Marc (de café, coffee grounds), clef (i'm cheating a bit there... It's an obsolete spelling of clé) and cul all end with a silent consonant!
mitchblank
mitchblank Yıl önce
Another thing that demonstrates how the Norman "es-" words in trick #1 is how some of those words still have English forms that DIDN'T lose the "e". For example from your list modern French "état" not only is related to "state" but also "estate"; French "étranger" is related to not just "stranger" but also "estranged"
I Wonder !?
I Wonder !? 14 gün önce
@mitchblank 😱 Thanks for the explanation mitchblank. I think my brain just exploded! 🤯
mitchblank
mitchblank 15 gün önce
@I Wonder !? neither, as far as I can tell. According to the dictionary I have at hand, "Aussi" was "Alsi" in Old French, which in turn was a contraction of Latin "Aliud Sic" It seems that the word starts with "au-" now is just due to later pronunciation drift. That "al-" prefix in latin appears in lots of words that denote "other". i.e. the word alibi means "elsewhere" (which, due to the use of Latin in law, leaked into english in the more specific sense of something that *proves* you were elsewhere). Or the word "alias"
q̵͑͜w̴̢̅e̵͖͐ŕ̵͙t̴̪̎y̶̻̋u̷͍͠ï̷̤o̷̲͐p̴͈̀a̴̘͛s̸̨͑d̷͠
q̵͑͜w̴̢̅e̵͖͐ŕ̵͙t̴̪̎y̶̻̋u̷͍͠ï̷̤o̷̲͐p̴͈̀a̴̘͛s̸̨͑d̷͠ 15 gün önce
norman french* is still french
I Wonder !?
I Wonder !? Aylar önce
@ant Sor I'm from 🇦🇺 & I recognised the word 'aussi'.....LOL! Does this word aussi have anything to do with the meaning of 'south' as in Australia or does it relate to meaning 'east' as in the country of Austria?
magister343
magister343 Aylar önce
@mitchblank "especialment" would literally mean "with a special mind." The standard French way of making adjectives comes from a Late Latin practice of using ablative absolutes describing the state of mind of the one performing the action instead of forming adverbs in more traditional ways. The French extended this practice to nonsensical scenarios where there were no minds involved.
Fledhyris Proudhon
Fledhyris Proudhon 11 gün önce
Brilliant and entertaining as always! Watching this, I was suddenly struck by the aural resemblance between the French for squirrel - écureuil - and the word equerry, which was (historically) the officer of the royal stables. Obviously this comes from the Latin for horse, equus, so there's no etymological connection, but it's a funny coincidence.
MattBlytheTheOne
MattBlytheTheOne Aylar önce
Wow. Very interesting. I could actually translate the final sentence after watching this. I hated wrote learning French verbs at school but understanding like this made learning way easier. I’m actually inspired to learn French now!
LEROY Jean-Michel
LEROY Jean-Michel 3 gün önce
I'm french and I think this video is lovely ! By the way, the french word for "coast" is also "côte", when used about wines (like "côte de bourg" or others...) it refers to the side of the valley where the vineyard grows, so a "côte" is always next to water... So yes, it is absolutely related to "coast".
SweetTea742
SweetTea742 13 gün önce
This video was fantastic!!! It was very informative and expertly delivered. I never took any French courses but did Spanish. I never expected to actually learn so much! Thank you very much! I'll be sure to _letter_ you know :)
Codem
Codem 2 aylar önce
As a French speaker this video was just as fascinating. I have to admit, I never considered the similarities between such words as Guêpe and Wasp, Guerre and War, Gardien and Warden... That third trick was mind-blowing!
q̵͑͜w̴̢̅e̵͖͐ŕ̵͙t̴̪̎y̶̻̋u̷͍͠ï̷̤o̷̲͐p̴͈̀a̴̘͛s̸̨͑d̷͠
q̵͑͜w̴̢̅e̵͖͐ŕ̵͙t̴̪̎y̶̻̋u̷͍͠ï̷̤o̷̲͐p̴͈̀a̴̘͛s̸̨͑d̷͠ 15 gün önce
41% of the english language comes from old french^^ how can people not know that rofl
Ugly German Truths
Ugly German Truths Aylar önce
@Lucas Garcia I would guess they get a lot more from greek and Scandinavian languages due to their history with roots in Byzantium (Which called itself Rome, but was grecophil, barely speaking latin if not forced to) and the Varangian immigrants (think Vikings, aka "the Rus") than from Latin. The French must be a remnant from pre-Napoleonic times when the Tsars admired european culture and most rulers in Europe spoke french next to their own language.
Steve Tice
Steve Tice Aylar önce
@68404 same with Spanish
Maelix Diogen
Maelix Diogen Aylar önce
@68404 200 000 I am not sure there is any language with such a lexicon length. But I will enquire. Catherine the Great, usurpating empress of Russia had a thing for Diderot if I remember well. Russian French half came with the Encyclopædia
Agni Das
Agni Das Aylar önce
@MurRothBro very doable. Just use French words with confidence, latin words too :) . Russian speakers tend to have a much larger dictionary than your average English speaker ... one of the reasons Russians have difficulty learning English is that they have to dumb down their language to preschool level in order to be understood in common speech unless you run into a doctor
Kathryn Polley Photography
Kathryn Polley Photography Aylar önce
Excellent! I remember my school teacher telling us about the missing S represented by the circumflex and I'd worked out the é for s myself but had never thought about the GU/W connection. Lovely to hear the explanation of why these things came about too. Conversation today about english collective nouns and whether they were really a thing or just something someone made up once which caught on - would love to know more!
Véronique Jeangille
Véronique Jeangille 21 gün önce
To be quite correct, it is not "GU/W", it is "G/W" and is a common occurrence between Roman and Germanic languages, e.g. Gaufre is related to Waffle, (pays de) Galles = Wales, etc. The U in guerre, guêpe etc is added after i or e to ensure the g is correctly pronounced. G directly followed by e or i, without the adjunction of an u, would be pronounced like the French J (e.g. manger, nager,...). To ensure a "soft" pronounciation of g before a, o or u, we add an e after g: nous mangeons. Like the u in "guerre", the e in mangeons is not sounded, it is just an indication on how to pronounce the letter g (soft or hard).
Greg
Greg 9 gün önce
As a guy from the other side (french) I found this really interesting !! The circonflexe accent is also placed on the emphased letter of the word. Also, french being french... some words like "côte" will give you a nice translation in a situation where you're talking about sea. But a côte is also a rib. It makes sense, becase your ribs are on your sides ; but it could be difficult to get the meaning if you're not french haha
Phil B
Phil B Aylar önce
This is why I love TRshow. It randomly sends me recommendations and every so often (notably not all the time) up pops an erudite informative speaker and I’m blown away how that individual isn’t a professional television presenter that I see on a regular basis. So Rob, marvellous explanations and I’m riveted by the way you put it across in such an entertaining and informative manner. Bravo Monsieur 👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻
barrelracer318
barrelracer318 5 gün önce
That is hilariously incredible to know. I took two years of french. I had a lot of trouble, by the end of the year, I could read it, but could never speak it. I can still look at the words some 18 years later, spot the ones I do know and can make out some of the expressed thoughts easily. But this adds a whole other level to it. When I saw yer starting sentence, I understood it had something to do with squirrels studying William, but I was like "What?" lol
Steve Gardner
Steve Gardner Yıl önce
Needs more of that disapproving French woman
Kathleen King
Kathleen King 5 gün önce
@Jessica Stanley Mari? A partner could be anyone Like, a business partner French seems for our fancy romantic stuff..(STUFF is also french..stuffe) Anniversary, nee, ( is birth, but English uses it for MAIDEN NAME unless you can use business, for affair😞)
Kathleen King
Kathleen King 5 gün önce
@Edie Wall I've heard..O.K. nah have come from D'accord
Anne Sophie RIGOLINI
Anne Sophie RIGOLINI 5 gün önce
@Kathleen King étage is floor like in a building. Story is histoire 😊. So stage probably comes from étage, but the meaning of each word evolved differently
GolumHD
GolumHD 10 gün önce
bro thé first sentence about écureuil will just Never be Saïd in a sober discussion lmao...
Thom
Thom 11 gün önce
Disproving or disapproving?
Gabrielle Molinaro
Gabrielle Molinaro 20 gün önce
Guillermo is William in Spanish. Spanish doesn’t have a W. Their word for “ward” is guarda. War - guerra. The way I’ve always thought of understanding other languages and the similarities in the language I speak, English, is things like dormir. It means “to sleep” in Spanish, and it makes me think of a college dormitory or a dormant volcano in English.
KenoBeatZ
KenoBeatZ Aylar önce
Wow, as a native French, this video blew my mind 😲 Merci pour la clarification ! 🥰
Major Pain
Major Pain 14 saatler önce
Thank you so much for this lesson. I studied German in secondary school and Spanish for the last 20 years. You have put a pair of virtual “French” reading glasses on my face. I suddenly find I can work out 90% of the French I read. I have never studied French; it has a little Spanish, and a lot of German words that are similar, but pow! Converting those other words into English fills in enough gaps to be able to be reasonably correct in what I am reading. So much so, I no longer have to use a translator for documents in French for my work. Thank you.
Philippe deRepentigny
Philippe deRepentigny 12 gün önce
Being French/English bilingual, I find this a very novel introduction to French/English philology. Your French is well seasoned. Bravo !
Kenneth Braun
Kenneth Braun 2 aylar önce
Studied French through 2 years in college and no one bothered to tell me any on this. FANTASTIC. Most effective lesson I’ve had.
Shawn Purcell
Shawn Purcell Aylar önce
Same here. I lived in France for 3 years and studied the crap out of French and never knew this. Oh well, Mieux vaut tard que jamais!
Maryann Spicher
Maryann Spicher Aylar önce
Right? I’m older trying to learn and this lesson actually helps! It’s much harder to get things to stick in my brain than it used to be 😂
Road to Platon
Road to Platon Aylar önce
I’m French, and I’ve to be honest that I use some of these tricks myself 😂 The word Intérêt, to know on which « e » the « ^ » is, I just go from the english « interest ». I can confirm that his explanation was really good. I wish you to be able to speak French perfectly one day, good luck!
Sharon White
Sharon White Aylar önce
Moi Aussi - never told this in my evening classes!
Josselin Cornillon
Josselin Cornillon Aylar önce
Being French, I found that very interesting, thanks very much! If I may just correct something, the “^” may actually change the sound of the letter: - On “a”/“o”, it closes the sound making it more “round”, deeper. - On “e”, it makes the same sound as “è”. - On “i”, it doesn’t change anything. - On “u”, it doesn’t change anything. - On “y”, it doesn’t exist (“y” is a vowel in French, I believe it’s not in English).
Nicolas Levet
Nicolas Levet 16 gün önce
Yep! a few examples "pôle" (like North pole) would be pronouced like first name Paul without the accent, "pâle" (pale) without the accent would be pronounced like.. well ..a famous brand of dog food or someting related to impalement (le supplice du pal). "râme" (paddle) without accent becomes a pack of 500 sheets and the pronouciation obviousely changes accordingely. And just for fun, the word "tram" (tramway) and "trame" (frame) are read differentely, "trame" is read as if there were a circuflex accent on the a.
Véronique Jeangille
Véronique Jeangille 21 gün önce
I must say that, in Belgium at least, we tend to lengthen the sound when there is a circumflex. E.g. "île" is not pronounced like "il" but rather like the English "eel"; same for fête, not pronounced like "faite" (feminine past participle of "faire") but longer sound. "Patte" and "pâte" are not pronounced the same either. On the other hand, "dû" and "du" are pronounced the same.
Karam Boubou
Karam Boubou 22 gün önce
also rhythm, which is why anyone saying "rhythms" is the longest english word without a vowel is wrong the actual longest one is "nth" aka the thing at position n in a (mathematical) sequence
Backintime Alwyn
Backintime Alwyn 22 gün önce
yes me too, I'm bilingual but I had no idea.
Andrew Wood
Andrew Wood 25 gün önce
y does act as a vowel sometimes in English... fly, sty, try.
James P
James P Aylar önce
Ah, écureuil... my favorite French word lol. I am learning French, and forget the French R - the "euil" sound is absolutely *the* most difficult sound to pronounce correctly. There are two reasons I like écureuil: First, it starts with a couple of difficult vowel sounds - é and u - along with the r, which is followed by the dreaded euil. All the most difficult stuff wrapped up in one handy word! Second, the English equivalent just happens to be very difficult for French people to pronounce, too (ask any French person to say squirrel). So I feel like we're getting back at the French for all the pain and anguish we have trying to pronounce écureuil lol. Anyway, great vid, thanks!
James P
James P Aylar önce
@Juicexlx We (Americans) don't realize it, but our R is also very difficult for non-native speakers to learn mdr. En fait, c'est le dernier son que nous apprenons quand nous sommes enfants !
Juicexlx
Juicexlx Aylar önce
Lol! I speak French. I pronounce it something like: Squee-reul
Electrowave
Electrowave Aylar önce
Why wasn't I taught this when I was trying to learn French? Would have made it a lot easier. A great video, thanks 🙂
Bill Murray
Bill Murray 18 gün önce
Probably because, if you were like me, your teachers were the simplest of 22 year olds, taking the simplest jobs your town had to offer.
Ugly German Truths
Ugly German Truths Aylar önce
Probably to avoid trying to reverse it and end up with false friends and to separate the pronunciations more.
Erwin Heinrich Stromer
Erwin Heinrich Stromer Aylar önce
The "Gu to W" fenomenon actually goes back to the Separation between Proto-Germanic and Proto-Italo-Celtic from later stages of Proto-Indo-European
Ly:bInhn DhInhm:Ateidr
Ly:bInhn DhInhm:Ateidr Gün önce
I approve your respelling of phenomenon, and thank you for the information in your comment.
Bill Murray
Bill Murray 18 gün önce
That's what I was gonna say...
Lisa Hinton
Lisa Hinton 3 gün önce
I really enjoyed this. Thank you so much, Rob. I started learning French "for fun" (HAHAHAHA... obviously, I am a lunatic) at the start of the Pandemic. I didn't know any of these little tricks but it sure does help! Thanks again - you're really good at these videos. (And I like the length just fine!)
TheMsLourdes
TheMsLourdes Aylar önce
This is brilliant and super useful to me, someone who really enjoys french and now has a chance of at least reading the language and figuring things out ;)
David Beattie
David Beattie Aylar önce
Rob, I love your enthusiasm and your down to earth approach to linguistics. It’s a refreshing change from the overly pedantic linguistics professors I had at University!
Bill Murray
Bill Murray 18 gün önce
Blast those overly pedantic linguistics professors, blast them!
unavoidably Canadian
unavoidably Canadian Aylar önce
OMG! Those tricks especially the third one are amazing. I spent years learning French in school and these make so so much sense. Super cool video
TEXT ME ON TELEGRAM 👉 FreeAgentLifestyle
TEXT ME ON TELEGRAM 👉 FreeAgentLifestyle 29 gün önce
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Niame Scrawls
Niame Scrawls Aylar önce
This video has helped me learn more than any French lesson before. Actually UNDERSTANDING the relationship between French and English helps so much
david2804me
david2804me Aylar önce
@Robert Nelson our experiences are similar. I’m fluent in French too because I lived in Belgium for several years and was ‘immersed’ in a relationship there from day one and that was how I learned not just to speak the language but also get a real feel for how it is used.
Robert Nelson
Robert Nelson Aylar önce
@david2804me Absolutely. I'm fluent in French... thanks to my wife. A long time ago I spoke decent German, after a few months of immersion... but then didn't use it much. Jetzt ist alles vorbei.
david2804me
david2804me Aylar önce
@Robert Nelson I genuinely believe that the best way to learn a language is 'horizontally'. Only total immersion on a day to day basis of your personal life in the language you want to learn will lead to complete fluency.
World Comics Review
World Comics Review Aylar önce
@Toe Cutter Read some more old-fashioned English (like 19th century detective stories), then just stare at German, and a remarkable amount of it becomes clear. Doesn't help much with speaking, mind you.
Robert Nelson
Robert Nelson Aylar önce
@Toe Cutter I learned German at the Goethe Institut (two sites). Immersion for several weeks. I realized that my German was pretty good when I found I could listen to the radio in German. I agree that the best way to learn is to jump in the pool.
David Wootton
David Wootton Aylar önce
I studied French at school, and have forgotten most of it. I like learning, and this is amazing. 🎇 Many thanks, and kind regards.
Who cares nowadays right
Who cares nowadays right Gün önce
This is absolutely hilarious! I’m in mad childish joy when I get to know such amazing things covered by history dust. This reminds me of similar Scandinavian pronouns to old English ones (what/hwat->hvad/vad)
Thor Nil
Thor Nil 13 gün önce
Most accents in French are actually substitutes for s. An interesting little etymological journey is castel to château with the s into an accent and the old french el into eau.
Popeyeanna
Popeyeanna Aylar önce
Oui! This is very useful for understanding the french language, and great for boosting understanding of vocabulary : D Hoping to use this as I study more french : D
Bill Murray
Bill Murray 18 gün önce
Aren't you supposed to say" "mais oui, mon cherie"? I've seen that in movies, and believe it is quite commonly used.
Guido Haas
Guido Haas 4 gün önce
I didn't "know" these but used them by deriving these by myself looking at the words and their similarities. Some tricks in the comments are also useful. What I hadn't seen so far was the "gu" --> "w" thing. Great information.
Margaret Pilling
Margaret Pilling Aylar önce
Really interesting video. My school French would have benefitted so much from this lesson. Many thanks .However my main translation problems came from understanding spoken French when visiting France. Quollocquial phrases learned helped. I went to evening classes for these as not taught in schools generally.
ElrohirGuitar
ElrohirGuitar 19 gün önce
This is the best lesson I have seen to understand the relationship of French to English. The reference of old French to old English was also helpful. On a trip to Germany, I found that I understood a great deal of German by relating words to old English. A bit of Latin thrown in and, voila, understanding appears. I still find I don't have a good ear for understanding French pronunciation.
Basenji Adventures
Basenji Adventures 29 gün önce
That was both very entertaining and very informative! And I have a feeling it will come in useful someday. 💯🐕🐕🐾🐾
Richard Anderson
Richard Anderson 2 aylar önce
After seven years of french in schools while young, and doing poorly at that, this has been the best language lesson I ever had. Thank-you!
Irena.El.O
Irena.El.O 2 aylar önce
I agree, its invaluable
Anna Lau
Anna Lau 2 aylar önce
Agreed!!
Vicki Mastriani
Vicki Mastriani Aylar önce
Very helpful! My husband is fluent in French but never told me this! I can use this! Thanks
Jeff Weed
Jeff Weed 15 gün önce
While I'm hopeless at pronunciation, I hope to learn to read French...this will be very helpful (as are the tips in the comments).
Paris Reid
Paris Reid Gün önce
Managed to improve my school boy French by ten fold! Many thanks for the informative and amusing video. 😂
sail2byzantium
sail2byzantium 13 gün önce
This was WONDERFUL! Loved it! Do you have any more of these concerning French decipherment? Merci beaucoup!
J Fryer
J Fryer 2 aylar önce
One of my favourites is ÉCHAFAUDAGE É goes to S CH goes to C The U needs the L change And finally AGE words are ING words Vowels are the glue that can change to other vowels So we can see the English word magically appear as SCAFFOLDING
Addhenn Akkhorr
Addhenn Akkhorr 2 aylar önce
@Treetop Jones I didn't know that fact, thx :) In french, the two possibilities are correct, even if I'd rather use the singular form there. Once again, I'm not sure about my sentence's relevance, but one thing is for sure, I'll keep on trying ;) After all, reading and watching are the only ways for me to improve myself, as I left school a long time ago. But, fortunately, being able to communicate with you, guys, is the best way, isn't it ? Thx guys, C U ;)
Treetop Jones
Treetop Jones 2 aylar önce
@Yeoh Lose it rather than loosen it.
Treetop Jones
Treetop Jones 2 aylar önce
@Addhenn Akkhorr Yes, no-one is perfect, like in saying "this kind of mistakes" s makes it plural, plural would be "these kinds of mistakes." Of course English speakers not fluent in another language can make the same type of mistake.
Addhenn Akkhorr
Addhenn Akkhorr 2 aylar önce
@Yeoh Ok, thx. Can't help thinking in french. In this sentence, in french, the comma would have been at the right place. Well, I'm glad you were a little tired, this way, you could help me ;)
Yeoh
Yeoh 2 aylar önce
@Addhenn Akkhorr Loose the comma after "so". I must really be bored and glad to help.
大崎梓美
大崎梓美 Aylar önce
I like your accent.. so artistic, story-teller voice.. I am japanese but when I learnt english I tried so many "english style" (usa/aus/can/uk) but for some mysterious paranormal and obscure reason, I prefer UK. Also, depending the location in Japan, the famous "R" letter are pronunced differently (R, N, L), honestly I prefer to say N for my R (japan) but in english, I can not pronunce them at all... I use W (for exemple forward > fow wawd)... Probably I prefer old Collins dictionnary versus Oxford. In french, accent of both (jap/uk) confuses me but I prefer to write then talk. For exemple in french : "merci, mais je peux me debrouiller toute seule" (thank you, but i can manage on my own) but with my accent : "messi, mi ji pu mo debroyer tute sol "(¬ . ¬)". Life is short so I try to learn things on my own "(ღ˘ ⌣ ˘ღ)"
Michael Williams
Michael Williams Aylar önce
Very interesting and very useful. Wish I'd known about this when we did French at school in the 70s would have been a lot more fun.
Marino Serra
Marino Serra Aylar önce
This is great, thank you. There is one mistake however and that is that the word "Côte" means "coast" not side. The word for "side" in French is "côté" with an accent on the "e".
Christina H.
Christina H. 3 gün önce
I loved this video. I have only had high school French but still would love to know more and this was so wonderful that I chuckled! Thank you!
Andy Gitarz
Andy Gitarz 2 aylar önce
The most accessible , understandable approach to learning words from another language. As an old boy in his 60's and never learnt French, watching this was like opening a door to another world . If you don't teach for a living, you should. I would be happy to sit in your class 😅 ..... Oh and also thank you for using the word "Trick" ... I am so fed up with everyone saying "Hack"
Wannag
Wannag Aylar önce
@Oafyuf O'Loaf Not Only. It could also mean "thing", "tip", or "shit" like in "look at that shit". It's basically used to designate something you don't know the real name. In this case, a "truc" in a magic trick is the illusion you use to fool the audience.
Oafyuf O'Loaf
Oafyuf O'Loaf Aylar önce
@Wannag "truc" means "stuff".
Miles Reid
Miles Reid Aylar önce
@Dr Naftak Now you’re just being pedantic.
Cath' J J
Cath' J J Aylar önce
@Mark Eckert And if the're hacking away like that, wear their bloody mask, thank you.
MossyMozart
MossyMozart Aylar önce
@Mark Eckert - They are all hacks! (As in "inexpert")
Gaganpreet Kaur
Gaganpreet Kaur Aylar önce
Thank You for sharing your learnings with others. This just popped in my TRshow recommendations and I found it extremely interesting and mentally stimulating. I will now be watching your other videos too.
David Pamely
David Pamely Aylar önce
I am enjoying your videos immensely as they are so informative. Thank you for making the effort. Do you happen to know if the Normans pronounced the 'W' in the name William as the English do today or did they use the 'Gu' sound?
Jack Sprat
Jack Sprat Aylar önce
Thanks for this enlightening video. Even though I do speak a little French, it was a very interesting exercise. Merci beaucoup.
Mancile Mazpas
Mancile Mazpas Aylar önce
Very clever ! I'm french and I find all what you explain so logical and interesting! Good to know. Thank you.
Sola Mano
Sola Mano 7 gün önce
Bravo! I've been fluent in French since I was ten but I've never seen anything quite like this to help non-French speakers!
OosallytomatooO
OosallytomatooO Aylar önce
Very interesting indeed !!! :) the "accent circonflexe" trick shows pretty obviously the latin origin of those words. In the other hand, the third trick shows that a subtsantial part of words starting with GU (and most of words starting with an H) have a germanic origin (or, in some cases like the verb "gober" or the noun "gobelet", a celtic origin). We can also keep in mind that almost every words ending with "ION" are very similar in both languages, not to say unchanged.
Sandra Lachance
Sandra Lachance Aylar önce
Wow! I put your video on with the intend of laughing a bit, but for real, man? You are such on top of all that! Even your last pronunciation of " écureuil" was one of the best I have heard! I am French Canadian and I advocate for the "two" Canadas to stop fighting and consider how close we are. Often, words played ping-pong over the canal more than once, like "budget" coming out of "bougette" which was French for a type of purse that English interpreted as the content of the purse and that French took back from them with that same meaning of income and asset... it's just facinate me.
CarlosMacMartin
CarlosMacMartin Aylar önce
Very cool tricks and tips. Thanks for sharing, mate. I was able to sort out some of the words with my knowledge of Spanish. 😁 Greetings from San Francisco, California, USA 🇺🇸
Nena Vaskina
Nena Vaskina 2 aylar önce
Hi! I have English and Russian as my native languages, and I have learned Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech and Bulgarian. I noticed many similar of these "tricks" which they never tell you in any learning resources, so I had to kinda do it all myself. It was very simple to learn Polish and Bulgarian, because all I really had to do was learn the "tricks" and at that point I already knew like 95% of the whole language. The funny thing was that within a week or 2 of learning, I could write full sentences and have hours long conversations with native speakers about everything in writing, but I could NOT understand the spoken language at all. Because while reading/writing I have a lot of time to look at the words and do all the tricks necessary to understand/to be understood. But it takes a much longer time to get used to the speech, and also there are like 50+ of these tricks and applying them all multiple times per word takes a lot of brain power, but after a while of getting used to it, it becomes like automatic and easy! Slavic languages are weird and it's hard to explain to anyone who doesn't know them, but when you know one and want to learn another one, it's not like you're learning a new language, but like learning a different set of rules and grammar and pronunciation of certain sounds, and a different way of using the words that you already know. I can try to make an example of the process, for English speakers. Every word that ends in s now ends in sh, except for ves, kes, les, pes which now end in th. And ms, ks, ns is now ch. So hands = handsh, and gloves = gloveth, mittens = mittench. All words where there is "LE" after a consonant, now is "ILL". Possible = possibill. Short i sound changes to oi after s, sh, z, f, v, and after r it becomes ai. After t it becomes short e, unless it is a -ting ending then it will become ching. So now, sitting = soiching, sticks = stekch. Ripples = raipillth. For making past tense, for words where -ed gave an extra syllable (e.g faded-yes, fixed-no) you replace -ed with -otch. Where there is no extra syllable, you replace -ed with ock. For irregular verbs there are random changes that you basically have to learn yourself and there are no tricks for them. Whenever there is a letter u or o after n, the n will become a soft ñ, and when e or a come after n, then n will turn into m unless it's a silent e then it'll stay as n. Every word beginning with in/im is now an/am. Letter r at the start of a word or in between vowels is now sh, unless the stress falls onto the next syllable then it'll stay as r. So orange = oshange, but arrange stays the same. Ňow I'm shiching a sentence with these mew shuleth, but ash you may see, ňot much hash changock. You can stell understand what I'm saying. I would meed to make dozench more "tshaickch" (tricks lol) for thish to be like a mew language. So there is my example of what it's like to learn another Slavic language, it's not even like learning a language, you know what I mean? It's just a bunch of stuff like that. But way more of them than what I wrote. A lot more vowel changes and letter changes and grammar differences, and word order differences, etc. but almost all based on the same words. It's quite similar as well learning Portuguese when you already know Spanish, just change a few little things with the pronunciation and grammar and the choice of words, then you're done! You now know a whole new language! You don't have to learn thousands of new words ,but just apply this new system of things to already existing words... Sometimes the choice of words is different as well, you know, if you say "I didn't mean to do that" in russian, it's like "I accidentally" but in polish it's like "I unintentionally" and in bulgarian it's like "I'm sorry, that's just the way things went" haha
Kasuga Ryuichi
Kasuga Ryuichi 25 gün önce
Adrian Johnson
Adrian Johnson Aylar önce
@김승훈 but brilliant! I was fascinated. I took one course in linguistics, and it was this sort of approach to comparing language families. I really liked it. There were these freak relationships between some languages that got separated by centuries of migrations splitting a people : Did you know Finnish is related to Armenian??? Celtic invasions from the east separated the people who spoke the root language they each evolved from.
Nena Vaskina
Nena Vaskina 2 aylar önce
@Caribbean Man also, it kinda blew my mind when I was trying to learn Chinese, because there are absolutely 0 similar words, like a complete, absolute, big fat 0, no tricks, no nothing. I learned it to an okay level, but I gave up on it in the end. Too much work compared to what I was used to haha. But it was an interesting and eye-opening experience to see how non-European languages are like!
Nena Vaskina
Nena Vaskina 2 aylar önce
@Caribbean Man yeah, there are even many of these tricks between English and Russian, kinda. You would think that they're totally different, but there are a lot of similarities. All English words which end in ical or ically (practically,, aesthetically, logically, fantastically, specifically, etc) are the same in russian except cal/cally is replaced with cheski (prakticheski, fantasticheski) Every word ending in -ality (nationality, originality, reality) is -alnost (natsionalnost, originalnost, realnost) Most words (but not all) ending in -tion are -tsiya, and -sion are -siya (informatsiya, natsiya, illustratsiya konstruktsiya, missiya, pensiya, agressiya, etc) English words where 'ch' is pronounced as 'k' are the same but with a h instead (haos, arhiv, sinhronizatsiya, eho, harakter, etc) I think this is because they are originally Greek words. All other Greek words like -phobia -philia -ology etc are pretty much the same. (bioligiya, filosofiya, tehnologiya, psihologiya, klaustrofobiya) Most names of professions, medical conditions, chemicals, elements, (and probably a lot more stuff) are the same words All words that begin with hy are the same except hy is gi, (hydraulic - gidravlicheskiy, hyperrealistic - giperrealisticheskiy, hygiene gigiyena, hydrotherapy-gidroterapiya) yeah they are getting a bit weird now haha. any other greek/latin words I can think of, like neurologist, pneumatic, pseudonym, maximum, stadium, apocalypse, they are also the same And words ending in -ism, osis are the same, except it's izm and z, so like gipnotizm, analiz, diagnoz, simbioz (symbiosis) Also hundreds of French words, which are also the same in English/russian, like espionage, brochure, prestige, baggage, toilette... Now for fun I'll try to make a russian sentence which could (maybe, probably not) be understood by an English speaker... Kvalifitsirovannyy spetsialist entuziaticheski sfotografiroval naturalnyy fenomen - gruppa intelligentnyh pingvinov, sidyaschih na aisberge v antarktide.... A qualified specialist enthusiastically photographed a natural phenomenon - a group of intelligent penguins, sitting on an iceberg in Antarctica... Heh, its kinda hard though cause not many verbs are the same, like sitting/sidyaschih isn't really similar and it's hard to make a sentence without verbs lol Lets try another one, moya sestra v avguste vizitirovala universitet po matematike i algebre, vizualizirovala brutalnyh abyuzivnyh professorov, dramaticheski evakuirovala planetu, asfiksirovalas ot defetsita atmosfery. Seryoznyy ekzistentsialnyy krizis! My sister in August visited the University of mathematics and algebra, visualized brutal abusive professors, dramatically evacuated the planet, asphyxiated herself from the defecit of an atmosphere. Serious existential crisis! Lmao xD
Kind Beast
Kind Beast 2 aylar önce
This is gold, thanks
Kevin McMurphy
Kevin McMurphy 16 gün önce
Absolutely brilliant. Most progress I’ve ever made in French in under 15 minutes.
Bretagne jean
Bretagne jean 9 gün önce
Lot of words are similar but sometimes they doesnt means same thing. As a french i see 4 words french can recognize in your com. Absolutely brilliant. Absoluement brillant. Progress progrès. Minutes minutes.
All and nothing
All and nothing Aylar önce
I'm French. First year of junior high, I was in a class in which we started learning English and German. Both languages were new to us, so every word was a discovery. Yet we quickly noticed that some words looked alike (for example certain weekdays: "Monday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday" vs "Montag, Freitag, Samstag, Sonntag"). When mentioned to our (really bad) teacher, she forbid us to compare both languages and ever talk about it (she was a bit jealous, because let's face it we had much a preference for English which seemed easier to grasp). Now, as an adult speaking a few languages and armed with more knowledge of Europe's history, I am amazed how backward it is to teach a language as if it had evolved in a silo with no connection with neighboring languages...
Sebastien H
Sebastien H 8 gün önce
@All and nothing - about pronunciation I totally agree w you - only starting very early would help
All and nothing
All and nothing 8 gün önce
@Sebastien H To be fair, my first English teacher was great. High energy, motivated and motivating. Throughout my 7 years of Collège/Lycée, I mostly had good or decent English teachers. My daughter also had an amazing teacher for her first year that made her love the course. Great teachers make a difference! One of the possible explanations that I heard about why French people suck at English (and the other way around) is that both languages use completely different frequencies which render pronunciation very hard for each other, (unless we spend a lot of time on it, or start at a young age)
Sebastien H
Sebastien H 8 gün önce
Most language teachers in France are extremely lazy intellectually, that’s why we are so bad at speaking English
All and nothing
All and nothing Aylar önce
@tacfoley I agree. I didn't thought that she was a good teacher as a teenager, but with maturity I'm even less impressed. Anyway 25 years later, I got over it and I'm just restarting learning German. Not to let a rotten teacher spoil the whole language...
tacfoley
tacfoley Aylar önce
That lady was NOT a teacher. I would have been incorporating all that knowledge into the lesson, and using it to show that family of languages. I was very lucky, growing up with no less than five languages in common use, and enjoy their application every day of my life!
First Last
First Last Aylar önce
Hopefully there's more languages you can do this with, this was amazing!
TheNeilFox
TheNeilFox Aylar önce
Absolutely awesome video. I paused at 10:58 and amazed myself that I was able to translate that sentence.
mitchblank
mitchblank Yıl önce
My personal favorite for rule #2 (since it confused me so much at first) is "goût" Just mentally turning it into "goust" doesn't help much at first. In english we have the word "gusto" which comes from the right latin root, but unless you know what it means in Italian it won't be of much help. However if you eat something really bad you'll say it's... "disGUSTing" Hey, it's our old pal Latin helping us out here -- as long as you can remember that "dis-gust" approximately means "bad-taste" then it's easy to see what "goût" must mean. Indeed, '"disgust'" in French is "dégoût" with the circumflex exactly where you'd expect it.
mitchblank
mitchblank 25 gün önce
@Valerie Anne Gagnon No, that's not true at all. The English word "gut" originally basically meant "entrails" and is of Old English origin, It's not directly related to "disgust" at all, which as mentioned above derives from Latin "gustare" via Old French. They don't have any direct relation.
Valerie Anne Gagnon
Valerie Anne Gagnon 25 gün önce
The word come from GUT as in the muddle age this is where you tasted your food. Your GUT loved it or it did not than it was DISGUSTING
Treetop Jones
Treetop Jones 2 aylar önce
Italian gusto became the English gusto, from taste to "a taste for life."
Treetop Jones
Treetop Jones 2 aylar önce
@리주민 Scotland: "Put yer troozers on before yer leave the hoos."
johannes914
johannes914 2 aylar önce
@Reedy_ In burgundy they have a small recipient they call "tâte vin" or "taste vin" you can easily guess what it means.
Alexa Penn
Alexa Penn Aylar önce
this was fantastic. i love that English is made up of so many other languages :) like from German or Deutsch - English people used to pronounce the k in knight and knife (and other words). 🌷🌱
LeCrenn
LeCrenn 20 gün önce
This is fantastic. I wish I’d known these tricks when learning French at school.
Perridan
Perridan 4 gün önce
Nice video. Did you get the idea from "The Loom of Languages"? For anyone who speak a neo-latin language there are similar tricks. What this book encourage is to learn to be on the lookout for any similarities between related languages. In French school teachers are encouraged to not try to make too many connections between French and other languages, I think it's a mistake, making connections makes it so much easier when it's a romance language or English.
Bruce Boettcher
Bruce Boettcher 16 gün önce
Thank you so much, Rob. I never knew the circumflex trick or what it does. BTW, most Spanish native speakers cannot say an initial sc, sp, or st. Hence, 'escuela', 'espiritu', 'estudiar'. Thanks again.
tim1724
tim1724 Aylar önce
#1 and #2 are good examples of where Modern English looks a lot more like Latin than Modern French does. All of those words beginning with "é" began with "s" in Latin. They became "es" in Romance (and remain "es" in most modern Romance languages) but became "é" in Modern French. Same thing with #2. Some other common ones: "ca" in Latin usually became "cha" in French: "cattus" → "chat", "cantare" → "chanter", "castellum" → "château", etc. "al" in Latin usually became "au" in French: "falsus" → "faux", "palma" → "paume", "salmo" → "saumon", etc. (Latin words beginning with "cal" will see both of those changes in French: "caldus" → "chaud", "caldarium" → "chaudron", etc.) "am" in Latin often became "aim" in French: "fames" → "faim", "amare" → "aimer", etc. Often there are other changes, particularly in the vowels, that can hide some of these. For example, "canis" -> "chien" … the "ca" became "cha" as expected but then the vowel changed too, moving the French word farther away from the Latin root.
KHRN2014
KHRN2014 Aylar önce
Thank you for taking the time to post this ❤️
Buck
Buck Aylar önce
This was surprisingly and genuinely one of the best videos I've watched on YT for a long time. Insta-subbed! Well done man.
chris Bruner
chris Bruner 23 gün önce
I've never been interested in the origin of words, or languages, but I'm finding your videos fascinating. I guess that's a new field of interest for me.
Mare Graphix
Mare Graphix Aylar önce
Brilliant! I'm sure the people who are highly proficient in English unconsciously know these things, but putting them in the realm of the conscious is absolutely exhilarating! When my son was in 6th grade he was given the option to take a language instead of reading, and since he had a mean reading teacher, he said, "Where do I sign?" I advised him to take French because he was a terrible speller, and I thought that French would strengthen his spelling because most of the spelling demons in English seem to be French words. He really enjoyed taking French. He also went on to teach himself German; he took Mandarin at Drexel for full credit, and he probably piled on another language or two when I wasn't looking. He would do this immersion thing; so I would find the word for cabinet written in German under a cabinet, or posted notes with the names of objects all over the house. He is also musical, mathematical, and is a computer wiz--all languages. I wonder how many people miss the fact that mathematics is a language. Needless to say, you have a new subscriber in me.
ceruleanblue09
ceruleanblue09 22 gün önce
Wish I'd known that French squirrels study history in the forest. I could easily go nuts for learning in a beautiful setting! No, really, I just discovered your videos. Very informative and fun! Alas, I must go, I hear la cloche de l'école and don't wish to be late for class! Great work, Rob!
Bill Murray
Bill Murray 18 gün önce
OK, that was acorn-y pun you hid in there!
Phil0369
Phil0369 2 aylar önce
Great topic ! I'm a French native speaker from Belgium, and in our dialect (Walloon) the word "guêpe" spells "wespe" ! The word "côte" in French has several meanings, like "coast" or "seaside", but il also means a slope, and the "Côtes-du-Rhône" are called so because the vineyard grows on the slopes along the river.
Mike Clark
Mike Clark 2 aylar önce
German is my second language, and "wespe" is the German word for wasp!
twangbarfly
twangbarfly 2 aylar önce
@Christian Martel This meaning is reflected in the English "costal/intercostal" - to do with the ribs/between the ribs ("une douleur costale/intercostale", where the disappearing "s" returns in the adjectival form, as in the adjective derived from "hôpital", "hospitalier"). Not far away from "coastal" - to do with the coast.
Christian Martel
Christian Martel 2 aylar önce
Côtes also means ribs as in « I like my côtes levées with a Côtes-du-Rhone » 😎
gfhrtsherghegh egewgewgew
gfhrtsherghegh egewgewgew 17 gün önce
i always knew english was largely french due to the norman conquest, and from learning english and coming across so many obviously french derived words, but this still surprised me just how deep the connection is
Donna
Donna Aylar önce
I would love to hear about the influence of Scandinavian/Viking language on English.
Tobias Knudsen
Tobias Knudsen Aylar önce
Wow, these heuristics are really useful, and give a nice insight into the cognisant overlap between the romance languages and fir instance english, but this also means they have some application for other languages.
amanda chan
amanda chan 2 gün önce
This video has been so much fun and so interesting! So much better than french class in my American middle school!
Simon Martine Ferland
Simon Martine Ferland Yıl önce
I just want to say as a French Canadian that there are different French accents, and that you said écureuil just fine for me, in fact, good job! I know it's a nightmare to pronounce for non-francophones 😆 You're nailing the pronunciation of Rs 😊
LuMi Naire
LuMi Naire Aylar önce
Same here, canadien français from Québec. Your French prononciation sounds very good, well good for an English (from England) speaking person. Even if I’ve been living my entire life in Québec I never use the way they pronounce them, I just speak plain French. Knowing that the French spoken in Québec is much closer to the orignal French of the colony before the French revolution. French people always ask me if I studied my French abroad and the answer is no. So my English sounds like I’m from New York My Spanish sounds like international Spanish unless I use specific words from my native country. My Italian sounds Calabrese as I grew up in an Italian neighbourhood with Calabrian friends. Now I work in a field where I deal with people from around the globe on a daily basis, so it’s fun to hear the same language spoken by different people from different countries.
colin mcdon
colin mcdon Aylar önce
@RobWords thank you greatly. You just made sense of a lot of things ive recently wondered.
Ogami Itto
Ogami Itto 2 aylar önce
"Squirrel" is also a nightmare for french speakers so, 1-1 ! :D
reba nelson
reba nelson 2 aylar önce
@Half Eye "Shibboleth". It's from the book of Judges, chapter 12, verses 5-6
Half Eye
Half Eye 2 aylar önce
@Lily Okay. I recogniced the typo just with your question. I didn't know about that slang word. But I adore word-plays (when I understand them). So, no harsh feelings. 😀
eastwestbalance
eastwestbalance Aylar önce
This helps me so much! Thank you!!! Opens up a whole new brain path!
Philippe Gimenez
Philippe Gimenez Aylar önce
Very interresting, indeed! It seems that we Frenchy are lucky, when it comes to learn foreign languages (well, mostly european ones), since being at the historical crossroad of Europe, we ended up having a lot of them mixed up with our own (and mixing our own into theirs!) This video shines some light on this phenomenom!
Juicexlx
Juicexlx Aylar önce
The Romans did this. Then, there are the Greeks, whose ancient words permeated all sciences everywhere in Europe either as prefix or suffix
Iserya
Iserya 8 gün önce
Thanks for that !! I speak french, and I speak english fluently for 15 years now. This video helps me to understand even further ! Thank you, that was so interserting.
Neil070
Neil070 Gün önce
Écouter (listen) is related to "acoustic". I used mnemonics like that to remember French nouns and verbs. "Fenêtre" = "Fenestra" (Latin for "window", related to "defenestration" which means " "the Russian businessman has fallen out of the window". Bet you'll remember "fenêtre" now.
Choucheeeenn
Choucheeeenn Aylar önce
The "accent circonflexe" for deleted "s" is very important, as it doesn't just notify "a "s" used to be there", but "a "s" still exists in the word "family". Forêt, forestier, hôspital, hospitaliser, côte, costaux (muscles), etc...
Boris Os
Boris Os Aylar önce
Now THAT was informative! I knew a lot of the "tricks", found out myself at 13 and the following years (had French only that year and one 2mt course some 14 years later, spoke with a dozen of french people in the meantime), when comparing to Italian which I apprehended between 14 and 16. Hope I'll make more progress in each once I get rid of my gaming addiction.
Choucheeeenn
Choucheeeenn Aylar önce
@pumbaa667 Les muscles costaux (un muscle costal, des muscles costaux) qui sont sur les côtes.
pumbaa667
pumbaa667 Aylar önce
"costaux (muscles)" AHAH, tu m'as tué mec >_
Steve Jones
Steve Jones Aylar önce
@StephSinalco Yes, and in Québec the difference in pronunciation is very marked. That's why people here were up in arms at the proposed spelling reform dropping the circumflex.
alnath01
alnath01 Aylar önce
@Erwin Pommel ??
L David
L David Aylar önce
Absolutely fascinating! Loved it, thank you!
Matt Youyou
Matt Youyou Aylar önce
I'm a French translator (en to fr). I'm amazed by your French pronunciation that is perfect (even for the word "forêt" which you pronounce exactly like French). There's not even a word you mispronounced. You pronounced everything like you were French. Even English ppl that have been living in France for decades don't have your perfectly-sounding pronunciation. Are you sure you're not French ? 😙And all your explanations are very very very very interesting. And you're very understandable for a French when you speak English. Your English accent/tone/voice is perfect.
pdlister
pdlister Aylar önce
Could that be because of the French lady that lives with you?
John Davies
John Davies Aylar önce
Thanks for fascinating and pedagogical programs. The combination of history, linguistics and the dynamic relationship and influence of French, Latin and Greek on contemporary English provides enlightening moments. Thanks, Your delightful presentations are really appreciated and I have informed my friends and family about your skillful pedagogical style.
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