The Lake Peigneur Giant Sinkhole Disaster 1980

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Dark History

Dark History

4 aylar önce

The in-depth story of the Lake Peigneur Drilling Accident: When The Earth Swallowed a Lake.
November 20, 1980, is a new day at Lake Peigneur in Louisiana. Some 9 miles north of the Vermilion Bay in the Gulf of Mexico, a charming, calm lake is a popular resort for fishermen and nature lovers..
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Footage used:
trshow.info/watch/2-N2TrcxkOA/video.html by Loren Klein
trshow.info/watch/rkIQgCxOL8M/video.html by Marion Blair
We reveal the world's darkest and greatest disasters all based on true stories.
This disaster documentary is inspired by the fantastic "Fascinating Horror".

YORUMLAR: 2 166
Peekeon05
Peekeon05
I am absolutely stunned that none of the miners were killed. It seemed like everything about this disaster was working against them, it really is a testament to how important it is to train employees on what to do during an emergency.
Helios Del Sol
Helios Del Sol
It is so incredible that no one died. Had that electrician not gone and checked that noise when he did, all 55 miners could have easily perished.
Moustache Panda
Moustache Panda
It's amazing that no one died in this incident. Kind of a relief in comparison to most of the other disasters you've covered.
Greg P
Greg P
It's amazing how twisted and wrong this story has gotten ,I was a 20 year old Electrician ,June Gaddison was my boss ,smoking in the mine was prohibited and he had walked out of area (1000')where our storage and lockers where to smoke a cigarette and he did hear fuel barrels banging around and shined his headlamp down the room (crosscut is another way to say it) and saw water pouring over a salt barricade across room to prevent people going into old parts of the mine and he came running back to our shop and hollering ,he did blink or switch off and on main power to mine below , Earl the footman(last name escapes me Brave man he received an award) on our shift jumped on his tractor and went down to make sure word got to them ,some ran to shaft and to mechanic shop to warn them and to call cage down ,they had trouble get the hoist operator because at that time he was talking to drilling company who had called to tell them to evacuate us from the mine ,we started using backup call buzzer which buzzes in hoist control room by the time the cage got down we could see water coming down the room and wiping out the main telephone backboard ,I was shoved onto cage and 11 or 12 of us got out ,the miners already down in the 1300' level (we only had just started ramps down to 1500') they couldn't call on phones so they traveled up the ramps with whatever could move with 2 front end loaders in front what kept water back was the rise in elevation of the room the leak started kept the water contained till they got to that level and assembled at emergency designated point and sent people to try to get to main shaft (cage) and also to emergency shaft (air shaft smaller cage could be sent down) used back up phone wind up phone and were told to try to go up old ramps to next level which they did using front end loaders to clear road of fallen scales so smaller vehicles could pass they proceeded to be taken up to surface the only injury was to office(mine) clerk she tripped and fell on a scale they had a tendency to remove there battery and lights (heavy, she was a very tiny lady) and yes everyone couldn't believe how close they started drilling it was not far from our barge dock but they did have wells all over the area and yes it was reported that when the lake drained in the canal started pulling water from the gulf ,shrimp boats in Delcambre were sitting in the mud and the cages and skips sitting and plugging shafts where heard to travel up 7 story mill building and hit there pulley block at top of mill that's all I remember.
Charles Jones
Charles Jones
I was a Geology graduate student at University of Southwestern Louisiana when this happened. I had given tours in the mine the month before when the Gulf Coast Geologic Society held their yearly conference in nearby Lafayette, Lousiana. Texaco had helped me by providing data from another area for my grafuate thesis and I talked with the Geologist that was in charge of the disaster well. What happened is this: Diamond owned the mineral rites for the lake since the 1930's. Texaco contracted to pay Diamond royalties for oil produced based on 1930s rates. By 1980 this was peanuts and Diamond was incensed that Texaco wouldn't consider negotiating higher royalties based on 1970-1980s rates. When Texaco contacted Diamond to check on the latest extents of their mine shafts, Diamond ignored them and never responded. Texaco said "well it must not be a factor since Diamond didn't feel the need to contact them." They picked where they wanted to drill, and as they say, the rest is history!
Greg Hayes
Greg Hayes
As a Safety officer for the gas network in Queensland Australia, it shocks me at times how contractors play against the odds and run the risk of having similar accidents. History should be highly valued, not ignored.
Rational Bacon
Rational Bacon
The smartest person involved in this event was the genius who "lost" those documents in the sink-hole. Pure Machiavellian brilliance 👌
Peregrination
Peregrination
I'm just going to agree with most people here and say, "Wow, a mining disaster where everyone survives? Incredible." And the miners were patient with a slow elevator while a lake drained on top of them. That's good emergency training. Often in these disasters there's poor training (coupled with short cuts for the budget). This is a possible example of a legit accident.
Verk Gaming
Verk Gaming
Once he started talking about a mine I knew what was gonna happen and 100% expected little no to survivors. That is truly incredible
Esperaj
Esperaj
I lived in a town where there were unknown mines all over. Homeowners were required to have insurance in case their homes collapsed into one-- it happened to a few homes in my neighborhood. Some tunnels were never documented at all, while others were not accurately mapped because they were made so long ago. It's not that surprising that their attempt to drill nearby a mine went so catastrophically wrong.
William Byrd
William Byrd
I worked at a mine that was just being opened. There were old mines in the area that were supposed to be separated by ten or so meters of solid rock. as they begin to actually cut new tunnes int the rock face they got back several hundred meters and their multi-ton mining machine simply vanished down a hole. the stone had collapsed and eroded after the old mines were closed until only a few feet of sandstone and shale separated the floor of the new tunnel, from the void below. The operator was a distance behind the machine, using a remote control linked to the machine by a control bundle of cables. fortunately for him, it was fitted with a quick disconnect to keep him from being pulled into the machine if the cables snagged. or the machine fell forty or fifty feet into a hole that wasn't supposed to be there.
Marti's
Marti's
My responses are numerous: first is the ineptitude and greed of money grubbing huge corporations and the worship of oil; second is the respect of this planet and the overwhelming power of water; most importantly is the sanctity of human life and the absolute necessity of safety training. I am jaw-dropped by each of these issues and that everyone survived. Thank you for this documentary!
Big Wendigo
Big Wendigo
This goes to show you how important safety procedures and training are! Good job to the guys on the rig and in the mine for keeping their heads cool.
Discipleof Christ
Discipleof Christ
Thank God those miners survived!
clementinesm
clementinesm
This story is always one of my favorites just because no people lost their lives directly from this. It amazes and elates me just how well the safety precautions for everyone worked out (plus a few close encounters with good timing). It ended up being the most insane ever disaster and everyone handled it perfectly.
Fuzzybeanerizer
Fuzzybeanerizer
The 1926 Barnes-Hecker mining disaster near Ishpeming, Michigan was somewhat similar to this. Routine blasting in the mine, 600 feet below the surface, opened into a natural passageway connecting to swamps on the surface. In that case, only one man escaped, by climbing ladders to the surface from the 800 foot level of the mine. At least 51 men died.
Carri Walker
Carri Walker
Wow. Kudos to the miners for staying calm in that situation. That’s crazy.
bdalbor's Archive
bdalbor's Archive
I live about 20 miles from where this took place. I've heard my mother talk about what happened there that day quite a few times. It's a miracle that all 55 of those miners survived. Just goes to show that proper training can go a very long way in saving lives.
J Yang
J Yang
Sometimes it's a breath of fresh air when everyone survives in these situations! Good on them
gardensofthegods
gardensofthegods
Thank you for doing such a thorough job ; really excellent work here .
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